I got an iPhone 5 for FREE! …and how you can too!

I am writing this article on the absolutely beautiful 4″ screen of a new iPhone 5, that I have owned for a week, and didn’t pay a dime for. (Okay, so maybe I only typed the first sentence actually on the iPhone, just so I could write that sentence.)

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Did you catch that first part? I got the phone for FREE, and no, I didn’t sweet talk a salesman into giving me a better price–I’m terrible at that stuff. Actually, my bank–the good people at ING Direct–paid for the phone. It’s a pretty sweet deal, and they’re offering the same deal to anyone that receives a pay cheque. Continue reading “I got an iPhone 5 for FREE! …and how you can too!”

I’ve now been married for 9 months. Considering how long I intend to be married, I suppose this isn’t a long time. Nonetheless, since we are still renting, I have had the future prospects of mortgages on my mind since tying the knot. (A man’s gotta provide a roof for his family!) So the opportunity to read and review Mind Your Own Mortgage by Robert J. Bernabe was an easy one to accept.

While this is another book taking advantage of the cultural subject matter at hand–reflecting upon the housing boom and resulting crash of the past ten years, the book was both incredibly informative and invaluable for a newbie like myself who is new to the housing market, and I don’t doubt it’s usefulness for those looking for some practical advice for something they may have many years of experience from.

Bernabe spends most of the book peddling his MYOM formula, which is a good formula by the way. But most of all I appreciate the time he spent in encouraging the reader to be a responsible spender, repeatedly reminding the reader that when you have a mortgage, any other unessential purchase you make is costing you much more in the end due to the option of using excess cash to pay down your mortgage, and thus paying less interest through amortization. I look at this as the best possible viewpoint I can have as a future new homeowner.

Bernabe also stresses the importance of shopping based on cost, instead of interest rate and payment. I’m actually excited to apply the knowledge he provides and the system he’s developed aided by the extras made available on MindYourOwnMortgage.com. But having completed the read and wanting to apply what I’ve learned, I’m in an unfortunate position now to see how these American rules might be similar to the Canadian rules of mortgages I find myself in. Most of the ideas will be very similar, but of course, it was the Canadian market that did not crash as hard. So I am anticipating differences in the process.

Now I am left to search for a Canadian equal to Bernabe’s excellent homeowner’s guide. Any suggestions?

[Note: Originally posted on CatalystSpace.com.]

Over the past couple of years, I have developed a friendship with Rabbi Daniel Lapin, a successful businessman, author and Jewish rabbi. I first came to know Rabbi Daniel by reading his incredible book, Thou Shall Prosper. This is definitely a must-read book for anyone who wants a clearer understanding of the biblical view of money. In fact, I bought a couple hundred copies and gave it to everyone on my team. It’s that good.

Thou Shall Prosper is a rabbi’s perspective on why Jewish people, no matter where they live in the world, have a disproportionate amount of wealth. Less than 2% of the people in the United States are Continue reading “”