Review: “The Gospel According to Jesus” by Chris Seay

People are not good or bad; they are simply broken, and God has either restored them to shalom or is seeking to restore them to shalom. Imagine seeing people as “broken shalom” or “shalom,” rather than good or bad. If you see them in the midst of broken shalom, it does not allow you to look down on them; instead, it calls you to join God in his redemptive work in their lives. What a beautiful privilege. — pg. 148

When I got my hands on Chris Seay’s The Gospel According to Jesus, I anticipated reading another book where an author attempts to write something “new” about God and the Gospel when in reality they end up simply preaching sermons I’ve heard many times on Sundays–nothing new under the sun.

The Gospel According to Jesus may not rewrite Scripture, but Seay certainly makes a good attempt to raise issues of interpretation that have run rampant for years, blurring the Gospel Continue reading “Review: “The Gospel According to Jesus” by Chris Seay”

Unequally yoked: Is it really a big deal?

Working with young people, one of the most common questions I hear stems from the apparent Biblical principle that we should not date/marry a person who does not have the same faith in Christ as we do.

Do not be unequally yoked with unbelievers. For what partnership has righteousness with lawlessness? Or what fellowship has light with darkness? — 2 Corinthians 6:14

The overarching idea seems to be that being in a relationship, with the assumption of eventually being committed to each other in marriage, to someone without the same faith standards as yourself would cause problems in the marriage, and out of a need to see eye-to-eye, could cause those strong in their faith to compromise on their beliefs.

What do you think? Is it really that important for a Christian to marry another Christian? Or is there really a case to be made for “evangelistic dating,” where the Christian tries to convert the non-believing partner?

What has your experience been? Add your comments.

Life and Death

Write something about our death to self and new life in Christ.

Use examples of things that die and new life is produced as a result, after fire, changing of seasons, pruning.

True Fasting

Write something on what God sees as true fasting using Isaiah 58 as a reference.

“On the day of your fasting, you do as you please and exploit all your workers.” (v. 3)

Isaiah speaks against our Western society

Write something with regards to Isaiah 56:9-12, and beyond. It talks about the wicked and how they are as lazy as dogs, lacking knowledge, with great appetites, “they never have enough.” Each seeks his own gain, similar to the individualism of our culture. As well it describes how they wish to party and have fun, obviously not knowing what is to come for them.

Draw parallels between the description of the people in this passage, the people left behind in Israel after the others were exiled, and our North American culture today.